Lynne Lawner

Sabrina Raffaghello Arte Contempora

Lynne Lawner was born in Ohio. A graduate of Wellesley College with a PhD from Columbia University, Lawner has been a Henry Fellow at Cambridge University, three times a Fulbright Research Scholar in Italy, a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, an American Association of University Women Fellow, a Fellow of the Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies (Villa “I Tatti”), a Radcliffe Institute Fellow, a Gladys Delmas Fellow in Venice, and a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Studies in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art. She has been a Visiting Professor at UCLA and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She has lectured at Yale, Harvard, Columbia, Vassar, Connecticut College for Women, Indiana University, and many museums and institutions including Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, the Bard Center for the Decorative Arts, the Chicago Art Institute, the Dayton Art Institute, the Italian Cultural Institutes in New York, Chicago, and Washington, the New York Harvard Club, Yale Drama School, and the National Arts Club. A few years ago, for the Smithsonian Associates, she devised a seminar based on her own photographs, entitled “From Sans Souci to Schoenbrunn: Great Castles, Palaces, and Gardens of Central Europe”.

Lawner’s fine art photography, a relatively recent development and passion in her life, has grown out of the same humus as her poetry. Her visual work is now in distinguished collections such as those of Gioconda Leykauf and Fabio Castelli. After showing her work at the inaugural edition of the MIA-Fair, Superstudio...
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Sometimes I see myself as a huntress in a woods or at the edge of a lake, waiting in ambush to seize her prey. Perhaps this metaphor derives form my studies of mythology.

My eye has been refined through many year of looking at artworks. The contemplation and study of paintings and other kinds of visual art have taught my eyes to recognize, select, and classify formal elements. Form and rhythm have been equally involved in my long-term dedication to music and poetry.

In the end it is nature that plays the essential role in my life. I cannot stay away from it for long without suffering spiritually and physically.

Well along in my career, and to my own surprise, photography has become the chosen way in which I respond to the innumerable signals nature sends out, indeed the pathway by means of which I enter into the dialogue between natural and artistic forms that has existed for centuries. In nature I rediscover the roots of art, letting them flourish in ever new elaborations. This privileged relationship, fascinating and inexhaustible, moves from knowledge to recognition and beyond.

Many persons ask me what techniques I use. My photographic skill consists mainly of patient observation. The camera allows me to capture and to share with others the consonant harmonies that are veiled when I go deep into natural environments, armed with a concentrated vigilance of senses and will. Is there such a thing as dissonance in nature? Nature knows where it’s going, that’s clear, but as it proceeds it manifests itself in a series of...
<i>Artist’s Statement</i><span>Read</span>