L'Agence à Paris

For nearly seven years now, photographer Nicola Lo Calzo has documented the multiple lineages and the various manifestations of the memories of colonial slavery, of the resistances to it, of its abolitions. He documents these memories because they create life, because they irrigate our present with wisdom and knowledge of the other that is essential to us. He made his own Edouard Glissant’s affirmation: “To forget is to offend, and memory, when it is shared, abolishes this offense. We need each other’s memory, not for compassion or charity, but for a new lucidity in a process of Relation. And if we want to share the beauty of the world, if we want to be solidary with its suffering, we need to learn how to remember together.” Nicola Lo Calzo’s quest has brought him to West African coasts (Tchamba), to the outskirts of Port au Prince (Ayiti), through the Mornes of Guadeloupe (Mas), to the forgotten neighborhoods of New Orleans(Casta), to the periphery of Santiago de Cuba (Regla), to the banks of the Maroni River (Obia). These stays, in all of these places, have been decisive moments in the photographer’s process – to restitute the vivacity and the beauty in the ways of being in the world of communities that resist amnesia by remembering the resistances to this criminal enterprise unprecedented in the history of the humanities that was colonial slavery. The photographer unveils the importance of living legacies that constitute the practices and knowledge of the communities that share this history. These legacies prolong a...
<i>Nicola Lo Calzo</i><span>Read</span>
Andrew Tshabangu is keenly aware of and sensitive to light, shadows and darkness. These elements - light, shadows, darkness and black-and-white film - are his tools, his instruments with which he expresses the humility, the vulnerability and the great wish to be human - regardless of whether one believes in God or in Allah or in Qamata or in Modimu. The people he photographs are his co-creators who allow him to enter their private, secret or sacred spaces and moments. You can sense his stealth when he does this, camera in hand. (Mongane Wally Serote)

The "Bridges" series focuses on religious and spiritual rituals taking place in unexpected sacred sites. Some of these sites are intimate indoor settings where we observe devotees deeply engrossed in prayer and sanctification, as if they have taken flight, transporting themselves into those realms that are beyond and above a physical world that is indifferent not just to their divinity but to their livelihoods. There are also open arenas where devotees revere the crucifix, or are in pilgrimages, in processions and engaged in ceremonial practices. ... It is not only through the devotees' entranced facial expressions, body gestures or pious postures that we learn about the significance of these spiritual rituals, but also through their uniforms and accessories. In their elegant white garments we see symbolic meaning, cultural hybridity, religious commitment and the seriousness of spirituality in the lives of those photographed. Grace, dignity and pride are also inscribed in these costumes,...
<i>Andrew Tshabangu</i><span>Read</span>